I Warned against IPOB madness but everybody kept quiet

0

by Onwuasoanya FCC Jones

When the IPOB madness started, I shouted myself hoarse trying to warn us that those guys weren’t for good. Many of our political leaders knew I was right, but wouldn’t dare say it publicly or support my campaign in anyway. Even sitting governors, apart from Hope Uzodimma of Imo State, made strenuous efforts to portray themselves as sympathetic to the IPOB, not because they believe in their campaign, but because they feel that it was the safest political thing to do.

Almost all notable opposition politicians, except, maybe, Chief Osita Chidoka, either kept quiet over the atrocities of the group or even gave them tacit support. They would try to justify their violent speeches, their terrorist acts and hooliganism. They gave vent to the anti-Fulani rhetoric of the IPOB, without caring about its long-term consequences on us as a people and our politics and commerce.

Media practitioners and activists didn’t want to be seen as working against their people’s interests. They couldn’t bear been called otellectuals, saboteurs and all those derogatory names. They flowed along. With the very encouraging exception of the proprietor of Njenje Media, almost every other media influencer from the Southeast either became unpaid promoters of IPOB and ESN and all the atrocities they represent. Politicians and upcoming politicians saw IPOB as the fastest pedestal to give needed spring to their political aspirations. They exploited that.

Today, the damages caused by the IPOB to the Southeast economy, politics and social life is unquantifiable. It will take ages to repair what have been destroyed.

Have lessons been learnt?

A lot of people already have their regrets about their support to IPOB, but they won’t dare voice it out. Some would rather sink in idiocy than admit wrongdoing, even though, when they get into their closets and think about the bloodshed, the sufferings, the economic sabotage and social trauma brought upon the Southeast by this group, they cringe. But that’s just in their closets. How would you speak against your “own people in public”?

I made a vow with my God, to do all within my powers to fight and speak for the general good and not to be swayed by the mob. I will be ready to stand alone on an issue, as long as I am convinced about it. I don’t also rule out the fact that my convinction could be wrong sometimes, but I rather go along my convinction and be wrong at the end and I will quickly reverse myself, than flow along with the crowd just because it is the safest thing to do.

Aham bu Onwuasoanya FCC Jones.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.